Monday 20 November 2017

Drug can help limit damage to body in wake of heart attack

The study was funded by the British Heart Foundation and carried out at a Newcastle hospital, where researchers studied 1,377 people for three years.
The study was funded by the British Heart Foundation and carried out at a Newcastle hospital, where researchers studied 1,377 people for three years.

A drug commonly used after transplant surgery could hold the key to limiting the damage suffered following a heart attack, new research has claimed.

The study concluded that temporarily decreasing a part of someone's immune system could be beneficial to them immediately after a heart attack.

Drugs like cyclosporin are used to do exactly that after a transplant, to stop the body rejecting a donated organ, and scientists believe they have found another use for it.

During a heart attack, a clot starves the heart of blood and can cause lasting damage. The heart is then damaged further by a mixture of chemicals and cells that rush in to the heart as blood flow is restored.

The study was funded by the British Heart Foundation and carried out at a Newcastle hospital, where researchers studied 1,377 people for three years.

Irish Independent

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