Tuesday 24 April 2018

Cystic fibrosis sufferers see dramatic increase in quality of life

In 2017, better health and the introduction of IVF means 26pc of the adult cystic fibrosis population aged 21 or over surveyed had children. Stock Image
In 2017, better health and the introduction of IVF means 26pc of the adult cystic fibrosis population aged 21 or over surveyed had children. Stock Image
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

People born with cystic fibrosis in Ireland are living longer and are more likely to have a job.

They are better educated, and an increasing number have their own home and are parents, according to a new report. The report commissioned by Cystic Fibrosis Ireland looked at improvements in quality of life of people with the disease between 1998-2017.

In 1998, people living with cystic fibrosis were not expected to be in employment. In 2017, a remarkable 54pc of those surveyed were in full-time or part-time work. Only 8pc of those surveyed were married in 1998, but this has risen to 26pc.

The median age of death from the disease in Ireland was only 17 years of age in 1998. It has now increased to 30 for the first time.

The report pointed out that in 1998 adults were not expected to have children of their own. In 2017, better health and the introduction of IVF means 26pc of the adult cystic fibrosis population aged 21 or over surveyed had children.

The national fundraising day for Cystic Fibrosis Ireland takes place on Friday, April 13.

Irish Independent

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