News Health

Monday 18 June 2018

Bacteria is found in children's face paints

The face paints were seized last year by inspectors from the medicines’ watchdog, HPRA. Stock Image
The face paints were seized last year by inspectors from the medicines’ watchdog, HPRA. Stock Image
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

Children's face paints used for Halloween were found to have high levels of bacteria that can lead to skin irritation or infections.

The face paints were seized last year by inspectors from the medicines' watchdog, the Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA).

The paints were on sale in a number of discount stores around Ireland.

The inspectors also bought baby wipes and baby powder, which were found to have higher than normal levels of bacteria when sent for laboratory analysis.

"The levels of bacteria were above the allowable limits for cosmetic products including talcum powder as well as face paints and baby wipes. High levels of bacteria can lead to skin irritation or infections, especially for those with broken skin or compromised immunity," a spokeswoman said.

"If you have any concerns about a cosmetic product you have purchased that you think may be unsafe to use, do not use it.

"Contact the supplier and the European manufacturer listed on the label."

The report revealed 673,906 dosage units of illegal medicines were detained during the year, including sedatives, anabolic steroids and male impotence medicines.

It received 3,264 adverse reaction reports about human medicines, up from 2,810 in 2015.

In addition, some 337 suspected adverse reactions and events involving veterinary medicines were reported to and reviewed by the HPRA.

Irish Independent

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News