| 15.3°C Dublin

Fee for one-year driving licence removed

Close

Motorists with special medical conditions will no longer have to pay for a year-long valid licence (Stock image)

Motorists with special medical conditions will no longer have to pay for a year-long valid licence (Stock image)

Motorists with special medical conditions will no longer have to pay for a year-long valid licence (Stock image)

DRIVERS with special medical conditions will no longer have to pay for a year-long valid licence.

Outgoing transport minister Shane Ross today signed legislation to waive the €25 fee for a one year driving licence, a special licence issued to applicants who suffer from medical conditions and require an annual reassessment of their medical fitness to drive.

A 10-year-licence currently costs €55, meaning over 10 years one-year licence holders would pay €195 more than a healthy person to be licensed to drive.

Minister Ross said the fee was "not fair" and hopes that removing it will relieve a financial burden for those in need of the special licence.

“I am very pleased to be able to announce this change, which should ease the financial burden on people who already have more than enough difficulty to deal with.

"The one year licence is a necessary part of our driver licensing system, given that there will always be people whose medical condition requires their fitness to drive to be reassessed on a regular basis.

"At the same time, I have concluded that asking people who are already in a difficult situation to pay annually to be able to drive is simply not fair.

"In future, therefore, the Road Safety Authority will be issuing one year licences free of charge.”

Online Editors