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Fears of flooding as high tides pose next coastal threat

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Cyclist Phil O' Brien from Hastings Street braves the bad weather near Poolbeg Lighthouse, Dublin

Cyclist Phil O' Brien from Hastings Street braves the bad weather near Poolbeg Lighthouse, Dublin

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

(Photo credit: Facebook/AranIslands)

(Photo credit: Facebook/AranIslands)

ESB worker Shane McGowan works on a telegraph pole in the area of Drumcliffe, Co. Sligo. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

ESB worker Shane McGowan works on a telegraph pole in the area of Drumcliffe, Co. Sligo. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

PA

Walking the prom was tougher in one direction than the other in Salthill Galway which took the brunt of Storm Rachel. Photo:Andrew Downes

Walking the prom was tougher in one direction than the other in Salthill Galway which took the brunt of Storm Rachel. Photo:Andrew Downes

Andrew Downes

A massive wave smashes off the cliffs at Doolin in Co Clare.
Picture: Press 22

A massive wave smashes off the cliffs at Doolin in Co Clare. Picture: Press 22

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Cyclist Phil O' Brien from Hastings Street braves the bad weather near Poolbeg Lighthouse, Dublin

NOW Storm Rachel has abated, residents in some coastal areas are living in dread of the next threat - the high tides forecast for next week.

Already, residents of Ballylongford, in Co Kerry, have more than 300 sand bags in storage which will be distributed to houses ahead of the expected high tides of over five metres next Thursday and Friday.

Council officials are due to meet with community leaders in Ballylongford in the coming days to discuss their plans.

The chairman of Ballylongford Enterprise Company, Noel Lynch, says residents are anxious that the €92,000 grant allocation from the Office of Public Works for flood defences be used immediately.

"The council has been very proactive but a lot of the people whose houses were flooded last year are elderly or retired and they feel very isolated because they have no insurance," he said.

Limerick City Council replaced the old sand bags at Verdant Place in the city on Wednesday as a precautionary measure but sand bags on the banks of the river near Kings Island have remained in place.

St Mary's Park, Limerick resident Seanie Quinlivan said people there were more worried about the high tides on February 20, which will be at the same level as last year's flooding.

"I've lived in the same house for the last 46 years and last year was the first time it flooded. Hopefully, we won't have the storm and heavy rain that came with the high tides last year," he said.

Irish Independent