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Thursday 23 November 2017

Everything you need to know about Friday's lunar eclipse

A partial solar eclipse is seen behind the 9th-century Prambanan Temple in Yogyakarta, Indonesia (AP)
A partial solar eclipse is seen behind the 9th-century Prambanan Temple in Yogyakarta, Indonesia (AP)
Denise Calnan

Denise Calnan

Stargazers in Ireland were treated to a partial eclipse on Friday night.

February's full moon grew a little darker and appeared as a deep red.

The eclipse began at 10.32pm and peaked at 12.34am.

The phenomenon appears when the sun, Earth and moon are aligned with the earth in the middle. The moon's surface will shine because it is reflecting the sun's rays.

The spectacle was visible across Ireland, as well as most of North and South America, Europe, Africa and most of Asia.

Although less spectacular than a total lunar eclipse, or a Blood Moon, people nationwide should have been able to get a good glimpse with Met Eireann forecasting a clear, cold night.

The penumbral eclipse is often mistaken for a normal Full Moon but, according to Astronomy Ireland, the next total lunar eclipse will be visible from Ireland on January 21st, 2019.

Those lucky enough to own binoculars or a telescope could also keep an eye out for the New Year comet, which was visible in our skies.

The comet was 7.4 million miles away, the closest it's been to Ireland since 2011.

Temperatures are set to drop to below minus three degrees tonight with severe frost and icy patches.

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