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Vote for me: Elections boil down to who you trust most

Gina Menzies


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Starting them young: Marie Sherlock and her daughter Bláthnaid (4 months) count votes in the RDS. Photo: Frank McGrath

Starting them young: Marie Sherlock and her daughter Bláthnaid (4 months) count votes in the RDS. Photo: Frank McGrath

Starting them young: Marie Sherlock and her daughter Bláthnaid (4 months) count votes in the RDS. Photo: Frank McGrath

Our lives are affected by whoever governs. Basic rights of citizens cross all nations: the right to food, shelter, education, security and health care depend on the provision of resources to fund these needs.

The battle ground of election campaigns focuses on how to determine the quantum of rights matched to realistic or achievable resources. How do we determine the common good and how to bring about a just society? How do we devise a social contract between citizens and government, and whom can we trust to guarantee its success?

Liberal democracies, characterised by co-operative, consensual relationships among individuals and groups in society, need agreed and sustainable objectives to ensure the rights of citizens. We face a challenge to inform ourselves about the choices, policies and trustworthiness of our politicians. How we provide opportunities for all to flourish is the ongoing political challenge.