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Trinity College Dublin back in world’s top 100 universities

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Trinity College Dublin is once more ranked in the world's top 100 universities

Trinity College Dublin is once more ranked in the world's top 100 universities

Back in the big time: Trinity has recovered its position in the top 100 after five years of failing to meet the mark

Back in the big time: Trinity has recovered its position in the top 100 after five years of failing to meet the mark

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Trinity College Dublin is once more ranked in the world's top 100 universities

Trinity College Dublin (TCD) is back in the top 100 universities in the world.

It is rated 98th in the QS World University Rankings 2023, up three places on last year and breaking a five-year run outside the top 100.

Trinity’s upward move is attributed to a rise in its academic reputation, based on how often its research papers are cited internationally.

TCD Provost Dr Linda Doyle said it was “great news for Ireland’s global reputation”.

She said rankings had shortcomings in how they measured everything that was happening in a university, but they were watched closely internationally, and it was “hugely important for Trinity and for Ireland that we are in the Top 100”.

But there are continuing warnings that Ireland will need to boost investment in higher education if it is to keep pace, or advance, in an increasingly competitive international stage.

University College Dublin (UCD) is the only other Irish institution to make the top 200, although it has fallen from 173rd to 181st place. NUI Galway, University College Cork (UCC) University of Limerick (UL) and Maynooth University (MU) also lost ground.

Dublin City University (DCU) is Ireland’s most improved university, climbing 19 positions to 471st place. Technological University Dublin retained it position.

The QS ranking uses six indicators, including academic and employer reputation, based on survey responses from more than 150,000 academics and 99,000 employers.

Overall, Ireland has improved on its reputation among employers, and displays a research prevalence in medicine.

QS senior vice president Ben Sowter said the “positive reputational” trends suggest that the country’s universities are continuing to command the respect of employers and are nurturing students for success in work.

But he added: “With Ireland experiencing record enrolment numbers, the challenge remains financial. Indeed, the obstacles to further improvement are clearest in the areas that require consistent investment: teaching capacity, for example.

“In many respects, Ireland’s institutions are performing well. However, in an increasingly competitive global environment, the limits to their success will be defined by investment.”


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