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Study periods mean pupils don't get required 28 hours of teaching time per week

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Research has shown that the amount of time that students spend in organised learning activities has a critical bearing on their academic performance and all-round development

Research has shown that the amount of time that students spend in organised learning activities has a critical bearing on their academic performance and all-round development

Research has shown that the amount of time that students spend in organised learning activities has a critical bearing on their academic performance and all-round development

The failure of some second-level schools to deliver the required 28 hours instruction a week to all pupils is highlighted in a number of recent reports.

Research has shown that the amount of time that students spend in organised learning activities has a critical bearing on their academic performance and all-round development.

A well-known, fee-paying girls' school offers such an "abundance" of choice that few teachers were timetabled for the recommended 22 hours of curriculum instruction each week, when inspectors called.

And some students in the same school were not receiving the minimum 28 hours weekly instruction stipulated by the department.

Inspectors commended Alexandra College, Milltown, Dublin for its extensive curriculum, but said such choice represented "significant challenges to the efficient use of available resources and the demands of constructing a workable timetable". They pointed to the need to comply with recommendations on timetabling and said addressing the question of teachers working 22 hours per week would alleviate some of their concerns.

At another fee-paying school in south Dublin, St Andrew's College, inspectors raised an issue about how some students with Irish exemptions, or who study one subject less at senior cycle, were timetabled for study periods, and because of that were losing out on instruction time

"School management should endeavour to provide tuition to this small number of students at these times" to ensure that the school is "fully compliant", the WSE stated.

At Stratford College, Rathgar, Dublin, inspectors asked for a review, after discovering some junior cycle students were timetabled for study periods and not receiving their 28 hours.

The 28 hours also came up during an inspection at Loreto Secondary School, Bray, Co Wicklow, where inspectors noted eight minutes a day allowed to 'form teachers' to take a daily roll call and carry out other administrative duties.

"Currently the daily eight-minute timetabled form teacher time is not directly supportive of teaching and learning and cannot be considered part of the required 28 hours of instruction time for students", the WSE stated.

Colaiste Treasa, a community college in Kanturk, Co Cork, and St Clare's College, Ballyjamesduff, Co Cavan, were also advised to make up shortfalls in tuition time.

Once on the department's site, you can choose the appropriate report or simply type the full name and area of your child's school into the search box in the top right of the page.

Irish Independent


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