Friday 21 June 2019

Leaving Cert Irish: Candidates have difficulty keeping up with 'extremely fast' Irish tape

 

All smiles: Students Alison Duffy, Lauryn Brady and Caoileann Nic A Bhaird review the Leaving Cert Irish Paper 1 at Colaiste Choilm, in Ballincollig, Co Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney/Provision
All smiles: Students Alison Duffy, Lauryn Brady and Caoileann Nic A Bhaird review the Leaving Cert Irish Paper 1 at Colaiste Choilm, in Ballincollig, Co Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney/Provision
Katherine Donnelly

Katherine Donnelly

Leaving Cert candidates sitting yesterday's Irish papers had difficulty keeping up with the tape in the aural part of the exam, said teacher Ruth Morrissey, a subject representative with the Teachers' Union of Ireland (TUI).

"It was extremely fast and even the layout of some of the questions was also quite long for an aural," said Ms Morrissey, who teaches at St Michael's Community College, Kilmihil, Co Clare.

She made an additional point about terminology for ordinary level students, some of which she regarded as "quite complex". She cited the word cáinaisnéis, the Irish for budget, and said "a lot of ordinary level candidates are not going to know that word".

In the written higher level paper, Ms Morrissey said "there was definitely no element of predictability in way questions are phrased - anything can come up".

Ms Morrissey shared a view expressed by many teachers yesterday that a lot students were banking on an essay choice on the health system, but instead health was a topic for the debate option and the task was not to discuss the system, but to write about young people not taking proper care of their health.

That could have been a problem for some students, she said.

Ms Morrissey said while the essay topics at higher level, which included the housing crisis, were varied, some were quite specific. For instance, she said students would have been familiar with the issue of women and equality but some may have felt that they didn't have enough to tackle the choice about women in sport.

Clare Grealy, a teacher at Dublin's Institute of Education, felt there was "something to suit every student" on the higher level paper.

As for the ordinary level paper, Ms Morrissey said it was in keeping with previous years.

Irish Independent

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