Monday 10 December 2018

Art and business papers leave students 'beaming'

Leaving Cert

Charlotte Stevens, from Primrose Hill National School, Celbridge, was crowned champion speller in the 2018 Eason Spelling Bee All-Ireland final which took place in The Helix in Dublin. Picture: Harnett
Charlotte Stevens, from Primrose Hill National School, Celbridge, was crowned champion speller in the 2018 Eason Spelling Bee All-Ireland final which took place in The Helix in Dublin. Picture: Harnett
Katherine Donnelly

Katherine Donnelly

There was a lot of positive reaction to the Leaving Certificate business and art papers.

Some art candidates left the exam hall "positively beaming", according to Gerard Lane, an ASTI subject representative who teaches at Presentation College, Athenry, Co Galway.

Topics covered in some "lovely" questions were the Bronze Age, Georgian architecture, 'The Book of Kells', Vermeer, Caravaggio and Impressionism.

"About 90pc of the kids in the county would have covered Impressionism," he said.

Earlier in the day, it was the turn of business. Mary Killilea, an ASTI subject representative and teacher at St Joseph's College, Nuns Island, Galway, described the higher level paper as "very fair and well balanced".

She welcomed the section 2 applied business question about a "greenway" as "very topical and very clearly laid out with good graphics and excellent links to text".

In the short questions, she said the different style of questions was "very positive" and she particularly noted a new departure, in Q6, where students had to fill in blanks.

Ms Killilea said while overall there were some challenging questions, it was needed to separate the students who were high achievers. She said the ordinary level paper was very student friendly and would reward those who worked hard.

Ruairi Farrell, a TUI subject representative and teacher at Coláiste Craobh Abhann, Kilcoole, Co Wicklow, agreed that higher level was a fair paper, although he thought some of the short questions were "quite wordy".

In the long questions, he said candidates would have relaxed at the sight of familiar names like Ryanair and Aldi. There were some questions that would "catch students on first reading, but they would have been OK if they took their time".

Some students he spoke to found it a challenge to complete the paper in the time.

Mr Farrell described the ordinary level paper was one that "students should have managed with ease".

Padraig Doherty, of the Business Studies Teachers' Association of Ireland and Moyne Community School, Co Longford, said the higher level was "fair and approachable", although challenging in places for those seeking higher grades.

Irish Independent

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