Monday 23 September 2019

Double take: Two sets of twins have their first day in country's largest primary school

Smile please: Twins Alex and Ollie Hanbay, from Drogheda, with their sister Isabelle and brother Aaron who are also twins and are in third class. Photo: Ciara Wilkinson.
Smile please: Twins Alex and Ollie Hanbay, from Drogheda, with their sister Isabelle and brother Aaron who are also twins and are in third class. Photo: Ciara Wilkinson.

Elaine Keogh

There were no first-day nerves for four-year-old twins Ollie and Alex Hanbay as they started school with their best friend by their side.

The boys were one of two sets of twins who started at Ireland's largest primary school yesterday, St Mary's Parish Primary School, Bryanstown, Drogheda, Co Louth.

Double trouble: Twins Sean and Stephen Daly from Drogheda. Photo: Ciara Wilkinson.
Double trouble: Twins Sean and Stephen Daly from Drogheda. Photo: Ciara Wilkinson.

"There are no nerves because they are together," said their mum Ciara Hanbay as her boys began junior infants.

The twins were delighted with their school bags which featured pictures of their favourite things.

"Mine has leopards and tigers on it," said Ollie, who also carried a small hippopotamus toy, while Alex's bag featured "burgers, a PlayStation and pizzas and muscles".

Ciara and her husband Ricky also have twins Isabelle and Aaron (9), who are in third class in the same school.

Ciara said her older twins "love it here". "I was a bit nervous at the beginning but everybody gets to know them. The teachers are all lovely," she added.

Also joining the school yesterday were identical twins Sean and Stephen Daly (4).

There were a total of 138 junior infants across five classes.

The school opened in 2012 and was an amalgamation of two other Drogheda schools - Fatima Girls' National School and Congress Avenue Boys' School.

Principal John Weir said: "No more than any other school, this [junior infants starting] is probably one of the most momentous days in the school calendar. In a school this size, obviously the normal logistics are multiplied."

Mr Weir said that, despite its size, "we like to think of ourselves as a large school with a small-school feel".

Irish Independent

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News