Sunday 24 June 2018

DCU invites employers in to lecture its students

The move is aimed at ensuring third and fourth-year students on technology-focussed degree programmes are up to date with current thinking and equipped for what lies ahead. Stock image
The move is aimed at ensuring third and fourth-year students on technology-focussed degree programmes are up to date with current thinking and equipped for what lies ahead. Stock image
Katherine Donnelly

Katherine Donnelly

Dublin City University (DCU) is to hand over lecture theatres to major employers to allow them to deliver master classes to undergraduates about the realities of the fast-changing workplace.

The move is aimed at ensuring that third- and fourth-year students on technology-focused degree programmes are up to date with current thinking and equipped for what lies ahead.

The concept of what DCU president Prof Brian MacCraith describes as the "living degree" is among the key elements of a new DCU strategic plan, entitled 'Talent, Discovery and Transformation', which sets out its priorities up to 2022.

The vision for the next five years reflects in part the incorporation last year into the university of a number of teacher-training colleges, which has broadened its offering.

DCU says the marriage between its tradition in technology and innovation and its new strengths in arts and humanities will enable it to chart a new path in creativity.

Among the plans on the creative side are the opening up of DCU campuses, and its cultural assets, to create a north Dublin cultural quarter.

In the short term, DCU is working with musician Philip King, famous for his 'South Wind Blows' broadcasts and 'Other Voices' project, around a number of events.

Prof MacCraith said the living degree was recognition that "graduates need to be emerging with an appreciation of the absolutely dramatic impact that technological development is having on the nature of jobs".

That theme found an echo at the annual education conference of the American Chamber of Commerce Ireland, the body representing US multinationals, which was held in Dublin yesterday.

Chamber president James O'Connor told his audience: "We cannot emphasise enough the importance of close alignment of our industry base with our education system."

The multi-faceted DCU strategic plan also takes on board Britain's planned departure from the EU, with a proposal to establish a Brexit Institute to explore the impact on government, business and society.

Irish Independent

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