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Ecstasy victim started to talk gibberish, inquest told

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The substance which is known to contain Methylamphetamine (MDMA Ecstasy) and Paramethoxymethamphetamine (PMMA).

The substance which is known to contain Methylamphetamine (MDMA Ecstasy) and Paramethoxymethamphetamine (PMMA).

The substance which is known to contain Methylamphetamine (MDMA Ecstasy) and Paramethoxymethamphetamine (PMMA).

A YOUNG man who took ecstasy began shaking and "talking gibberish" before suffering a fatal cardiac arrest, an inquest heard.

The death of Adrian Nealon (31) prompted a coroner to warn of the risks involved in taking the drug, referring to the recent deaths of Michael Coleman and Liam Coffey.

The two men died in a house in Kinsale last week, after apparently taking a form of powdered ecstasy containing the compound PMMA.

Yesterday, Mayo Coroner John O'Dwyer said: "It is unfortunate that people continue to take serious risks with their own safety and their own lives.

"It is incumbent on people to be acutely aware of the dangers posed by drugs which are being offered them".

He recorded a verdict of misadventure at the Castlebar inquest into the death of Mr Nealon, with an address at The Kiln, James Street, Westport.

The cause of Mr Nealon's death on March 1 was given by pathologist Dr Tamas Nemeth as an overdose of MDMA -- the chemical used to make ecstasy.

Friends of the deceased gave evidence of drinking with him in a house at Lower Charles Street, Castlebar. There were no drugs involved, they said. Mr Nealon was drinking Druid cider.

Maureen McKenna said that later in the evening Mr Nealon started shaking in the armchair.

"He got really hot", Ms McKenna said in a subsequent statement to gardai.

"I had to turn off the fire. He was talking gibberish and he couldn't focus his eyes. We brought him out the back for fresh air."

After an ambulance was called Mr Nealon suffered a cardiac attack which proved fatal.

Evidence was given to the inquest that an ecstasy tablet with a "smiley face" design was found on the deceased's clothing.

Garda Sergeant Peter Hanley said that on analysis it was found to contain MDMA.

Garda investigations failed to uncover any concrete evidence of who might have supplied the drugs.

Irish Independent