| 11.9°C Dublin

Dublin Pride goes online to call for end to discrimination

Close

Having a ball: Paul Ryder co-hosts the Dublin Digital Pride festival from the Mansion House in Dublin. Photo: Niall Carson/PA Wire

Having a ball: Paul Ryder co-hosts the Dublin Digital Pride festival from the Mansion House in Dublin. Photo: Niall Carson/PA Wire

PA

Having a ball: Paul Ryder co-hosts the Dublin Digital Pride festival from the Mansion House in Dublin. Photo: Niall Carson/PA Wire

There was no colourful march down O'Connell Street yesterday, but the Dublin Pride Festival was celebrated online to raise awareness about discrimination faced by the LGBT community.

Jed Dowling, CEO of Dublin Pride, said yesterday was the grand finale after 11 days of events and activities held online due to the coronavirus pandemic.

"We've still been able to achieve a lot of that with our online activities but it's obviously a huge disappointment that we can't be on the streets.

"There's still systemic bullying, there has been an increase in hate crimes over the last two years here in Ireland. There are 72 countries where it is illegal to be homosexual - that was 73 a week ago but we've managed to get it down to 72.

"It's still punishable by death in some countries, so I don't think you could get much more discrimination."

Mr Dowling said that while Ireland had come a long way in the treatment of members of the LGBT community, they were still discriminated against.

"We've come a long way but that doesn't mean that there isn't still bullying or that people aren't still the victims of violence," he said.

"That still happens. In particular, a lot of trans youth are the victims of violence and attacks so it's still an issue."

Over the past 11 days organisers have held virtual walking tours, talks, exhibitions and céilís.

Irish Independent