| 7.2°C Dublin

Denise Chaila: a nasty comment online is barely the tip of the iceberg

Close

Limerick based rapper and singer Denise Chaila. Picture: Don Moloney

Limerick based rapper and singer Denise Chaila. Picture: Don Moloney

Limerick based rapper and singer Denise Chaila. Picture: Don Moloney

Limerick musician Denise Chaila has urged that racist comments online should not be ignored.

The Zambian born talent, who appeared on last night’s Late Late Show, opened up about the online abuse she received after performing at the National Gallery of Ireland, saying that it was polarised.

“The reaction was very polarised. There were a lot of people who loved and embraced what I was doing, and there were a lot of people who saw it as a direct challenge to their Irishness.

“We need to do better,” she said.

“My gut reaction was that I did not become a musician and sacrifice all of the things that I worked and sacrificed in order to stand here and read death threats to my parents,” she said.

“I felt like it was actually a moment for me to realise that I needed to be more responsible about how I navigated my blackness in this country.”

She revealed that she did not leave her house for a month following the performance.

“I spent like a month at home, I didn’t want to leave.

“I think we dismiss the power of those comments too quickly.”

Ms Chaila said that negative comments online should not be ignored and that people should make more of an effort to call out abuse.

Daily Digest Newsletter

Get ahead of the day with the morning headlines at 7.30am and Fionnán Sheahan's exclusive take on the day's news every afternoon, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

“There's a tendency for people to dismiss the power of the far right in this country

“A nasty comment online is barely the tip of the iceberg.”

She said that racism continues when racist comments online are ignored.

“I never want to see another friend of mine leave their groceries at Tesco because they're getting racist abuse from people in the queue. This is the dark side of what we chose to do when we chose to diminish what happens on the internet and what happens online.

“We make ourselves by our complacency guilty of enabling things,” she added.


Most Watched





Privacy