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Dark days of 70s recalled as push to quash homosexuality convictions gains momentum

The Tullow case, where eight males were shamed by a judge for their so-called crimes, was typical of Ireland then, writes Catherine Fegan

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Kieran Rose, of the Gay and Lesbian Equality network (GLEN), is part of a working group looking to get historic ‘crimes’ by gay and bisexual men overturned by the State and some form of redress put in place for those convicted. Photo: Frank McGrath

Kieran Rose, of the Gay and Lesbian Equality network (GLEN), is part of a working group looking to get historic ‘crimes’ by gay and bisexual men overturned by the State and some form of redress put in place for those convicted. Photo: Frank McGrath

Kieran Rose. Photo: Frank McGrath

Kieran Rose. Photo: Frank McGrath

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Kieran Rose, of the Gay and Lesbian Equality network (GLEN), is part of a working group looking to get historic ‘crimes’ by gay and bisexual men overturned by the State and some form of redress put in place for those convicted. Photo: Frank McGrath

The eight defendants, who were charged with almost 70 counts of gross indecency, had all pleaded guilty. The youngest of the males, one of two juveniles, was 15.

It was late January 1970 and, as they stood to receive their sentences, there was silence in Carlow Circuit Court.


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