Monday 16 July 2018

Paul Williams: Deadly Kinahan-Hutch feud is linked to €7.6m Tiger kidnapping

The sight of heavily-armed garda checkpoints and patrols on the streets of Dublin’s inner-city has become so familiar that the innocent citizens, including young children, living in these areas no longer notice them. (Stock photo)
The sight of heavily-armed garda checkpoints and patrols on the streets of Dublin’s inner-city has become so familiar that the innocent citizens, including young children, living in these areas no longer notice them. (Stock photo)

Paul Wiliams

The sight of heavily-armed garda checkpoints and patrols on the streets of Dublin's inner-city has become so familiar that the innocent citizens, including young children, living in these areas no longer notice them.

The assassination of Gerry 'The Monk' Hutch's nephew Derek Coakley Hutch last weekend was a reminder that the Kinahans are determined to wipe out their former partners in crime.

So far the Kinahans have taken the lives of 12 people: 10 were associates of The Monk and his family and the other two men were completely innocent victims.

Kinahan gang member David Byrne was shot dead at a boxing weigh-in at the Regency Hotel on February 5, 2016, in an attempt to kill leading members of the gang.

That miscalculation unleashed an unprecedented backlash on the Hutch faction.

So far three of Gerry Hutch's nephews, a brother and his two closest life-long friends have been executed by hit men. Hutch has been forced to flee the country and go into hiding.

So how did this begin?

The spark that ultimately lit the fuse was the murder of Hutch's nephew, Gary in Spain in September 2015 which was followed three months later by a failed hit on the Monk in Lanzarote.

But the dispute between Gary Hutch and Daniel Kinahan can be traced to a row over the proceeds of a massive tiger kidnapping in Dublin in 2009.

Hutch was a member of the gang that got away with €7.6m in cash from the Bank of Ireland in College Green in Dublin after a bank employee was kidnapped along with his partner and her family.

According to underworld sources who spoke to the Sunday Independent, Daniel Kinahan had agreed to launder €2.5m of the loot for Gary Hutch who moved to live in the Costa del Sol with the rest of the gang.

Eventually Gary Hutch began to demand his money and accused Kinahan of ripping him off. Relations soured further when Hutch threatened to reveal how the Kinahans had double crossed several of their international business partners, including a notorious Dutch drug trafficker, Robert Mink Kok (56).

Mink Kok, a convicted gun-runner and international cocaine trafficker, had been a close associate of Daniel's father Christy Kinahan ever since they first met in Holland in the early 1990s.

In August 2011, Mink Kok was arrested in Lebanon along with two accomplices after undercover police seized 53kg of cocaine in one of the biggest drug busts in Lebanese history.

One of the men was in possession of an Irish passport in the name of a drug addict from Tallaght in Dublin and which was believed to have been supplied by the Kinahans. Mink Kok and his associates were subsequently jailed for eight years each.

Back in Marbella, Daniel Kinahan had taken full advantage of his absence: Gary Hutch claimed that they assassinated Mink Kok's bag man in Marbella and poached his South American suppliers.

He also claimed that the Kinahans had stolen a large shipment of drugs belonging to a separate Dutch gang.

The situation reached a tipping point when Gary Hutch then sent a hit man to murder Daniel Kinahan but instead shot and injured an innocent man.

Over a number of months there had been 'sit downs' between Gerry Hutch and the Kinahans in a bid to spare his nephew's life and prevent any escalation in hostilities.

Daniel Kinahan agreed not to kill Gary Hutch and €200,000 was paid over as compensation by Gerry Hutch. Kinahan agreed that Gary Hutch could return to Marbella but then reneged on the deal and he was shot dead.

Paul Williams also co-presents the Newstalk Breakfast Show

Sunday Independent

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News