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In October 2021, Robert Durst was sentenced to life for the murder of his friend after being interviewed for a documentary. Photo: Etienne Laurent/Pool/Getty Images

In October 2021, Robert Durst was sentenced to life for the murder of his friend after being interviewed for a documentary. Photo: Etienne Laurent/Pool/Getty Images

Lynette Dawson with husband Chris Dawson, who is suspected of her murder in Australia

Lynette Dawson with husband Chris Dawson, who is suspected of her murder in Australia

Sophie Tuscan du Plantier's family asked for their contributions to be removed from Sky's documentary 'Murder at the Cottage'

Sophie Tuscan du Plantier's family asked for their contributions to be removed from Sky's documentary 'Murder at the Cottage'

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In October 2021, Robert Durst was sentenced to life for the murder of his friend after being interviewed for a documentary. Photo: Etienne Laurent/Pool/Getty Images

In the run-up to the release of Jim Sheridan’s true-crime series Murder at the Cottage: The Search for Justice for Sophie, the biggest talking point was that the family of Sophie Toscan du Plantier asked Sky to remove their contributions.

When they agreed to take part in the programme, they believed it could help achieve long-awaited justice for their murdered loved one, but instead felt it focused too much on Ian Bailey – the man convicted, in absentia, of voluntary homicide by a French court and sentenced to 25 years, despite a lack of concrete evidence.


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