Friday 15 December 2017

Craig Doyle and wife Doon celebrate anniversary in 'To Hell & Back' challenge

1500 lunatics came thru
1500 lunatics came thru "Hell & Back", Irelands toughest 10k at Kilruddery Estate Co.Wicklow Sunday 7th October. Barbed wire, electric shock, ponds of peril, Satan's pit were all obstacles on the man made hell on earth covering 1200 acres. Craig and Doon Doyle were finishers
1500 lunatics came thru "Hell & Back", Irelands toughest 10k at Kilruddery Estate Co.Wicklow Sunday 7th October. Barbed wire, electric shock, ponds of peril, Satan's pit were all obstacles on the man made hell on earth covering 1200 acres. Craig and Doon Doyle were finishers

Kevin Keane

TV STAR Craig Doyle crawled and climbed his way through "Ireland's toughest 10km challenge" for the sake of his wife Doon yesterday.

Ten years after they married, the chat show presenter proved the flame of love still burns strong as he helped his wife through the gruelling cross-country course in the mountainous grounds of Killruddery House near Bray in Co Wicklow.

The pair who have four children,crawled, ran and climbed their way through fields and rivers for the event entitled 'Hell and Back' with 1600 other competitors.

Among the other well- known personalities not afraid to get dirty were TV3's Sinead Kissane, former international rugby player Malcom O'Kelly and Olympic kayaker Hannah Craig.

Doyle has been extremely busy of late with the launch of his new chat show on RTE 2 and a rugby show on ITV but decided to take the day off to help his wife complete the race after she confided in being "a bit nervous" with some of the course's obstacles.

"We waited for each other so it was really nice. There aren't many races where you'd do that. Usually you just put the head down and gun it but in this you waited for each other and we finished as a team," Doyle (41) told the Irish Independent as he rested up.

The 41-year-old trains in the Wicklow hills where he lives so was well used to the rough terrain. Organiser Simon Bewley said most competitors found the obstacles the toughest aspect of the event.

"Ten kilometres in itself isn't that long a distance but what we have is the naturally tough terrain, the Little Sugarloaf mountain, we've got swamps and rivers and the forest. Then for manmade obstacles we have a pit filled with car tyres, a seven-and-a-half foot wall to scale, we have sheep wire fencing with a two-volt shock -- enough to give competitors a bit of a jolt."

The quickest runner got around the course in 42 minutes, the Doyles meanwhile came home around the 1hr 50min mark.

The presenter promised to be back again next year.

Irish Independent

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Promoted Links

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News