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Covid-19: Is Ireland in danger from a second wave?

The big read: The reopening of pubs and increased air travel have prompted fears among scientists of a second wave of infections. Is it likely to happen and will there be another lockdown? John Meagher reports

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Six-week lockdown: Medical staff wearing PPE get ready to enter the Flemington flats in Melbourne, Australia after the city introduced new restrictions

Six-week lockdown: Medical staff wearing PPE get ready to enter the Flemington flats in Melbourne, Australia after the city introduced new restrictions

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Professor: Dr Liam Glynn from the University of Limerick

Professor: Dr Liam Glynn from the University of Limerick

Second wave: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a Cabinet meeting this week; and below, new restrictions have limited the number of worshippers at Israeli synagogues to 19

Second wave: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a Cabinet meeting this week; and below, new restrictions have limited the number of worshippers at Israeli synagogues to 19

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A synagogue  in Tel Aviv, Israel as new restrictions limited the number of worshippers to 19

A synagogue in Tel Aviv, Israel as new restrictions limited the number of worshippers to 19

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Six-week lockdown: Medical staff wearing PPE get ready to enter the Flemington flats in Melbourne, Australia after the city introduced new restrictions

On May 24, while Ireland was announcing 57 new Covid-19 cases and four deaths, Israel seemed to have truly flattened the curve: a country of 8.4 million, it reported just five new cases and no deaths.

For a number of days towards the end of that month, its new case tally was in single figures. A wholesale easing of restrictions started to come into effect.

Schools reopened, shops and businesses largely resumed where they had been before the pandemic and crowds flocked to beaches on the Mediterranean and Sea of Galilee. Prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu was bullish: Israel was back on its feet. The battle against the coronavirus had been won.