Wednesday 22 November 2017

Sister of ex-judge loses case over €16m home sale

Ms Doyle/White had given evidence which was not only frequently unreliable 'but unfortunately deluded in many respects', Mr Justice Richard Humphreys said (stock photo)
Ms Doyle/White had given evidence which was not only frequently unreliable 'but unfortunately deluded in many respects', Mr Justice Richard Humphreys said (stock photo)

Tim Healy

The sister of retired judge Barry White has lost a High Court action in which she claimed her family had obtained up to €2.9m less from the sale of their parents' home than they could have.

Aideen Doyle, otherwise Clodagh White, had sued two of her sisters over the sale of Chimes, Mount Anville Road, Goatstown, Dublin, for €16.1m.

There were seven children in the White family including retired High Court judge Barry White, who gave evidence in the case.

Ms Doyle/White had given evidence which was not only frequently unreliable "but unfortunately deluded in many respects", Mr Justice Richard Humphreys said.

"Regrettably, I am satisfied that her lengthy history of launching allegations is the work of a fantasist", he said.

She had sued Niamh and Derval White, as administrators of their mother's estate, claiming she is owed at least €350,000 for her share of the extra that could have been achieved from the sale of Chimes in 2007.

The court heard negotiations had been taking place with developer Niall Mellon but that deal did not go through and it was sold by tender. Mr Mellon subsequently bought it from the successful tenderer.

Ms Doyle/White claimed the administrators had breached their duty to get the best price, which reached €19m in a private offer from Mr Mellon at one stage.

Mr Justice Humphreys ruled there was no breach of duty as administrators.

He found evidence from Barry and Niamh White to be honest and reliable while Ms Doyle/White's evidence was evasive and misleading.

Ms Doyle/White had treatment in Beaumont Hospital which involved the removal of a portion of her brain in the frontal lobe, the judge said.

Despite a DNA test to the contrary, she developed the belief she was not a biological sibling based on "alleged conversations with shadowy advisers", he said.

Irish Independent

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