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Sean Junior: my sacking was part of a 'clear out'

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Sean Quinn Jnr arrives at the Employment appeals Tribunal yesterday. Picture: Damien Eagers

Sean Quinn Jnr arrives at the Employment appeals Tribunal yesterday. Picture: Damien Eagers

Sean Quinn Jnr arrives at the Employment appeals Tribunal yesterday. Picture: Damien Eagers

SEAN Quinn Junior has claimed he was unfairly dismissed from his father's former company as part of a "clearing-out process of the Quinn family members", an inquiry has heard.

An Employment Appeals Tribunal yesterday heard that the father-of-one was notified in a letter while out on sick leave in June 2010 that he was not a suitable candidate for the positions available at Quinn Insurance at the time, which were outlined in the correspondence.

The tribunal heard the 35-year-old had been employed at the company for more than 11 years and was on a salary of €75,000, before bonuses, before being dismissed from Quinn Insurance, the company founded by Sean Quinn Senior, in June 2011.

Barrister for Mr Quinn, Ercus Stewart, told the tribunal yesterday that Michael McAteer - the joint administrator of the company who was appointed by the High Court in 2010 - had said the Quinn family would "never, ever have any involvement in this insurance company ever, ever, ever again".

However, Mr McAteer said these remarks were made in the context that the Quinns were not involved in the single bid that had been made to purchase the company, which was eventually bought by Liberty Mutual.

It was also claimed yesterday that Mr Quinn had been asked not to attend management meetings, which Mr McAteer confirmed, and said he felt Mr Quinn's presence "would be confusing for staff".

Mr McAteer was also accused of pointing at five employees with close ties to the Quinn family and saying "you're a friend of Sean Junior".

However, Mr McAteer said he couldn't recall that meeting and said he would not have used that language.

Mr Stewart said his client was offered a number of alternative positions by the company's new administrators, all of which were unsuitable as he was not qualified for them or they were junior roles.

The tribunal heard that eight members of Mr Quinn's immediate family had worked at the company, and that just one had transferred to Liberty Mutual, while others took redundancy.

It was also claimed that the role Mr Quinn held was then made into two positions, with salaries in excess of €100,000 each.

Yesterday was the second day of the case, which had opened in May 2013. The hearing continues.

Irish Independent