Thursday 25 April 2019

Notorious criminal fell out with gangland associates

Paschal Kelly is one of the country’s most notorious gangland criminals and he will be in his late 60s when he is released from jail. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto
Paschal Kelly is one of the country’s most notorious gangland criminals and he will be in his late 60s when he is released from jail. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Ken Foy

Paschal Kelly is one of the country's most notorious gangland criminals and he will be in his late 60s when he is released from jail.

He was sentenced to 18 years in prison for his role in a €92,000 tiger kidnapping during which three women were tied up and abducted.

Father-of-two Kelly's 60 previous convictions include assaults, escaping lawful custody, robbery and road traffic offences. In March 2015 he was sentenced for threatening to kill a Criminal Assets Bureau (CAB) officer and failure to provide tax returns.

He received 10 years for a post office robbery in 1997 and four years for another robbery offence in 1989.

Kelly (53) was a key member of the gang that ordered the murder of Real IRA boss Alan Ryan in September 2012, but has since fallen out with many of his former associates in that mob, including the major north Dublin drugs trafficker nicknamed 'Mr Big'.

Kelly and 'Mr Big', who is currently on bail for serious offences, had a bitter falling out when the younger gangster failed to pay back Kelly a five-figure cash sum which was owed to him.

Since he has been locked up, Kelly has been the victim of threats by many of his former associates - he had to be transferred off a wing in Mountjoy Prison in November 2015 - and the ageing gangster is considered a "hate figure" to many of the capital's younger gangland criminals.

Last November, Kelly smashed up a TV in his Cloverhill Prison cell when he realised his tiger kidnapping trial was going against him.

Kelly had denied all charges but last year he was found guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court. Sentencing him yesterday, Judge Karen O'Connor paid special tribute to the three women who were victims of his violence.

Irish Independent

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