Tuesday 19 November 2019

Killer Dwyer keeping a low profile in Cloverhill

Graham Dwyer has been keeping a low profile since he joined the ranks of remand prisoners in Cloverhill jail in Dublin
Graham Dwyer has been keeping a low profile since he joined the ranks of remand prisoners in Cloverhill jail in Dublin
Tom Brady

Tom Brady

Graham Dwyer has been keeping a low profile since he joined the ranks of remand prisoners in Cloverhill jail in Dublin.

His biggest problem is filling in his time as he sits in his cell.

The former architect was accustomed to spending a lot of his day on the internet, as the evidence in his trial showed.

But the prison population is denied access to the internet, for obvious reasons, apart from a handful involved in social media classes.

Dwyer will remain in Cloverhill until he has been formally sentenced to life imprisonment by the Central Criminal Court.

After sentencing he will be immediately taken to Mountjoy Prison where he will be processed and then transferred to wherever he is to serve out his jail term.

A decision on his new home has not yet been taken but he is guaranteed that his near neighbours will all be hardened inmates, who are also serving lengthy sentences for their crimes.

Dwyer is currently being held under a restricted regime as prison officers minimise the risk that he might be harmed, either by himself or by other inmates.

Dwyer will no longer be eating top cuisine in the capital's restaurants - his menu over a 28-day period now includes beef steak, pasta bolognese, chicken supreme, pork curry and fillet of fish for dinner.

The choice for tea ranges from turkey salad to scrambled egg and grilled tomato, hot dog with onions, bun burger with coleslaw and meat pie with peas. Desserts include fresh fruit and fresh yoghurt.

Meanwhile, general secretary of the Association of Garda Sergeants and Inspectors, John Redmond last night commended his members, who had been involved in the investigation into the murder of Elaine O'Hara.

Asked about recent criticisms of garda investigations from the Garda Inspectorate, Mr Redmond said it was easy to be critical with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight.

"But when you are out in the middle of the night, on your own, you don't have that benefit and you have to make a decision, there and then.

"Sometimes, it goes right and sometimes it goes wrong."

Irish Independent

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