Wednesday 13 December 2017

Dublin man admits selling Viagra from his home by mail order

Tom Tuite

A DUBLIN man is awaiting sentence after a court heard today that he has admitted supplying Viagra from his home by mail order.

Marc Kelly, with an address at St John's Avenue Clondalkin, has pleaded guilty to nine counts of breaking medicinal products regulations but has yet to learn what penalty he will receive.

He is facing prosecution following a probe by the Irish Medicines Board (IMB), which had him summonsed to appear at Dublin District Court today.

His charges state that on July 21, 2011, at his home address, he had imported the sedative Valium into the State without being granted a manufacturer's authorisation by the IMB.

He also unlawfully kept and supplied a medicinal product named Cialis which contains the prescription-only active ingredient Sildenafil Citrate.

The IMB has also alleged that on and around the same date he had imported and had for supply Viagra another, more well-known, drug used to treat men with erectile dysfunction and which also contains Sildenafil Citrate.

Sildenafil is confined to prescription control and requires advise of a medical practitioner.

It can cause serious side effects for people suffering from heart problems and can also result in headaches, stomach-aches and visual problems.

Mr Kelly also pleaded guilty to having and supplying a medicine named Xenical, another prescription-only drug which is used in weight loss treatment.

On June 16, 2011, he issued an advertisement for the prescription only product Cialis and he has also admitted that he did “supply by mail order Viagra”, on April 8, 2011.

His barrister Cathal O Braonain told Judge John O'Neill today that a guilty plea was being entered and that Mr Kelly was agreeable to covering the IMB's costs in bringing the prosecution ahead of the sentencing hearing, but he would be need some time to come up with the money.

Solicitor Tom Casey, representing the IMB, told Judge O'Neill that €3,555 was due to his client to cover the expense of analysis and destruction of products seized during the investigation.

Judge O'Neill noted that guilty pleas had been entered and that the defendant was prepared to pay the costs, and he deferred hearing the evidence.

He said it would be better to wait until the IMB's costs had been discharged before the court hears the facts of the case and considers what sanctions it will impose on Mr Kelly.

The offences can carry sentences and fines and the accused, who did not address the court, was ordered to appear again in December.

Online Editors

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Promoted Links

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News