Thursday 14 December 2017

Boy who said he would kill children sent to UK facility

Mr Justice Peter Kelly said the disturbing evidence before the court was that the boy was considered to pose a risk of violence to himself and others, and had said he intended to kill his younger siblings. (stock photo)
Mr Justice Peter Kelly said the disturbing evidence before the court was that the boy was considered to pose a risk of violence to himself and others, and had said he intended to kill his younger siblings. (stock photo)

Tim Healy

A teenage boy who has said he intends to kill small children to stop them growing into "bad and violent adults" needs urgent assessment and treatment, the president of the High Court has said.

Mr Justice Peter Kelly said the disturbing evidence before the court was that the boy was considered to pose a risk of violence to himself and others, and had said he intended to kill his younger siblings.

The judge said the HSE was entitled to orders making the boy a ward of court, and for his transfer to the UK for specialised psychiatric assessment not available here due to absence of an appropriate facility.

The undisputed medical evidence before the court stated the boy, following exposure to violent and pornographic material on the internet, believed there were bad and violent people in the world. He believed he should kill children when they were small to avoid them becoming bad and violent people, the judge noted.

He has said he intended to kill his younger siblings and the evidence was that his statements should be taken seriously.

The evidence also showed the boy had an interest in cannibalism, the judge said.

The boy, who is presently in an institution that cannot be identified, had previously harmed himself and a consultant psychiatrist considered he was at risk of doing violence to himself and others, the judge noted. From the "disturbing" evidence, he was satisfied the boy needed urgent and effective treatment.

The boy is considered to be on the autism spectrum, but a full assessment of his clinical needs cannot be carried out here because there is no suitable facility.

His parents share the concerns about his psychiatric state and have supported the application to have him made a ward of court.

They also supported his transfer to the UK facility in circumstances where no full diagnosis had been made, but wanted concerns about administration of medication as part of that assessment to be taken into account, the court heard.

They asked to be kept informed on medication and other issues and to visit him regularly in the UK.

The judge said, while he understood the parents' concerns, the evidence was that trial of medication would be done under close medical supervision, and in circumstances where the boy had court protection.

He considered the HSE was entitled to the orders making the boy a ward of court and for his transfer to the UK for assessment. He also noted the HSE would fund regular visits by the parents to their son.

Irish Independent

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Promoted Links

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News