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Thursday 13 December 2018

Compensation for gardens lost to new bus corridor 'will be linked to property values'

Bus stop in Ranelagh. Pic Steve Humphreys
Bus stop in Ranelagh. Pic Steve Humphreys
John Downing

John Downing

Compensation for portions of gardens lost to new bus corridors will be linked to property values, Transport Minister Shane Ross has confirmed.

It means that home owners in affluent parts of south Dublin, where property prices are high, can expect a premium to be paid if some of their land is compulsory-purchased for Bus Connects.

Mr Ross strongly defended plans for major bus corridors in and out of Dublin and pledged compensation for gardens lost to the project.

Mr Ross said houses in areas of south Dublin, which are close to his own political base, may lose most. But he insisted that in such cases compensation, tied to property values, would reflect these losses.

The plans, signalled by the National Transport Authority (NTA) this week, will take up to 10 years to deliver. Mr Ross said the NTA would in October detail the specific houses likely to be affected and negotiations would be undertaken with householders.

He told RTÉ’s Seán O’Rourke show that the 16 radial bus routes had the potential to revolutionise commuter travel. The plan could halve travel times to and from work, and also attract people to cycle more in Dublin.

This would mean tackling pollution and climate change at the same time as easing traffic congestion. He acknowledged that some houses would lose gardens, which was regrettable.

“It’s not a completely satisfactory situation – of course it is not. But there’s got to be space made by taking space off people’s gardens for the public good,” the Transport Minister said.

Mr Ross said there would be particular “pinch points” in south Dublin, around places such as Rathmines and Templeogue.

Irish Independent

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