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Closure of park for cull of red deer sparks upset

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Brought back from the brink of extinction 50 years ago, around 900 lowland red deer now live in the Killarney area.

Brought back from the brink of extinction 50 years ago, around 900 lowland red deer now live in the Killarney area.

Brought back from the brink of extinction 50 years ago, around 900 lowland red deer now live in the Killarney area.

A large section of Killarney National Park was closed to the public yesterday morning while a cull of red deer took place.

The Wednesday closures are set to continue into the middle of next month as part of a culling programme.

Brought back from the brink of extinction 50 years ago, around 900 lowland red deer now live in the Killarney area. Roaming deer have been blamed for at least two road fatalities.

There was a strong reaction to the cull on social media with one woman saying she could not stop crying at the thought some of her favourite deer might be killed.

The cull is being carried out by National Parks and Wildlife Service rangers. They are concentrating on red stags and are avoiding females as they will now be in calf, according to informed sources.

The Irish Deer Commission said while a cull was needed in Killarney, it must be done in a manner that had full regard for animal welfare.

Irish Independent