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Thursday 21 November 2019

Children feel ‘unsafe’ in direct provision

Members of the Seanad Civil Engagement Group (back, from left) Niall O Donnghaile, Billy Lawless and Paul Gavan; (middle) John Dolan, Grace O’Sullivan and Alice Mary Higgins (front) Lynn Ruane, Colette Kelleher and Frances Black at the proposal of a bill to enable refugees in Ireland to be reunited with their dependent loved ones. Photo: Collins
Members of the Seanad Civil Engagement Group (back, from left) Niall O Donnghaile, Billy Lawless and Paul Gavan; (middle) John Dolan, Grace O’Sullivan and Alice Mary Higgins (front) Lynn Ruane, Colette Kelleher and Frances Black at the proposal of a bill to enable refugees in Ireland to be reunited with their dependent loved ones. Photo: Collins
Robin Schiller

Robin Schiller

A report into families living in direct provision in Ireland has found children feel "unsafe" and "unhappy" in what have been described as overcrowded conditions.

The report was undertaken by researchers at University College Cork on behalf of the Government and it showed that children also have concerns relating to their food and relationships with staff at centres.

The report found children are "unhappy" about the length of their stays in the system, with a number of respondents saying they have lived in the system since they were born.

Many also feel they are stigmatised because of where they live, in addition to suffering from racism.

One child said: "There are loads of men bothering us."

Other children reported being frequently subjected to rudeness and insensitive treatment by staff in the centres.

The report was published by the Department of Justice yesterday.

It involved a Government consultation with 110 children, aged between eight and 17, living in 11 direct provision centres across the State. Of the 4,786 residents of direct provision, some 1,230, or 25pc, were 17 years or younger.

Irish Independent

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