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Sunday 22 September 2019

Boat bombing victims are remembered

Remembering: Mary Hornsby, whose son Paul was killed on Lord Mountbatten’s boat in 1979. Photo: James Connolly
Remembering: Mary Hornsby, whose son Paul was killed on Lord Mountbatten’s boat in 1979. Photo: James Connolly

Gerry McLaughlin

"Not in our name" was the message that rang out from an ecumenical service to mark the Mullaghmore bombing 40 years ago.

Up to 250 people gathered on a rain-swept clifftop to remember the lives of Lord Louis Mountbatten (78), his daughter's mother-in-law Lady Brabourne (82), his grandson Nicholas Knatchbull (14) and Paul Maxwell (15), who was working on the boat.

All died as a result of an explosion caused by an IRA bomb on August 27, 1979.

Among those at the ceremony were rescuers and medics who responded to the incident, along with former staff of Classiebawn Castle, Lord Mountbatten's holiday retreat.

Church of Ireland Archdeacon Isaac Hanna, from Drumcliffe, said no family should again have to experience the trauma endured by those bereaved by the attack.

"This community stood with this family and the victims and all those affected to say this was not done in our name," he said.

Wreaths at a memorial service in Mullaghmore, Co. Sligo, in memory of Lord Mountbatten and the others that died on his boat in 1979. Photo: James Connolly
Wreaths at a memorial service in Mullaghmore, Co. Sligo, in memory of Lord Mountbatten and the others that died on his boat in 1979. Photo: James Connolly

Paul Maxwell's mother, Mary Hornsey, said the love and support of the service had been a great comfort to the family.

When her son died, they marked his grave with a Celtic cross in the Protestant part of the cemetery. "That was our way of saying to the people of Sligo and Ireland, we forgive you," she said.

Ms Hornsey added she would ask the political leaders "to think about the people and not their parties, doing what is best for the people".

Irish Independent

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