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Bee kind: 'Help pollinators by not mowing lawn'

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Good buzz: A bee goes about its work as it collects pollen from an Echium Candicans plant in a sun-kissed garden in Cabinteely, Co Dublin. PHOTO: PAUL SHERWOOD

Good buzz: A bee goes about its work as it collects pollen from an Echium Candicans plant in a sun-kissed garden in Cabinteely, Co Dublin. PHOTO: PAUL SHERWOOD

Good buzz: A bee goes about its work as it collects pollen from an Echium Candicans plant in a sun-kissed garden in Cabinteely, Co Dublin. PHOTO: PAUL SHERWOOD

Environmentalists are urging people to let their gardens have "bad lawn days" in order to save bees and other vital pollinators.

To mark the UN's World Bee Day yesterday, Wicklow Social Democrat TD Jennifer Whitmore said society needs to rethink how we view our gardens and green spaces.

And as everyone endures "bad hair days" during the Covid-19 lockdown, she said we should also let our gardens get a little wild in order to encourage bees and other pollinators like butterflies to flourish.

"Each of us can play our part. From 'no mow May', to people leaving pollinator-friendly patches in our gardens to go wild or to plant pollinator-friendly plants, to allowing urban areas to be as wild as possible, there is lots of good work going on across the country which needs to be supported and enhanced," she said.

"We all need to shift our mindset, to see the value in weeds and wild flowers. For example, up to 40 species of bees and insects rely on nettles. We need to move away from 'tidy' to protect our biodiversity."

Irish Independent