Monday 19 August 2019

At lace value: Oldest customs in Irish culture now protected

Intangible heritage: Kate Middleton wore Carrickmacross lace, an Irish tradition, on her wedding day. PHOTO: PA
Intangible heritage: Kate Middleton wore Carrickmacross lace, an Irish tradition, on her wedding day. PHOTO: PA
Kirsty Blake Knox

Kirsty Blake Knox

Carrickmacross lace, which Kate Middleton wore on her wedding day, is one of 30 cultural practices granted State recognition to 'protect' them for future generations.

The National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage has been established to recognise Ireland's living culture.

It can include practices, traditions, communities, languages and skills that define the country's cultural identity.

It can also include animals, and all nine native dog breeds have made the list.

Other customs on the list include loy digging, sheepdog training, currach building, letterpress printing, basket making and Traveller tinsmithing.

While some traditions are national, others are particular to distinct regions.

For example, the Fingal Mummers - who dress in straw costumes and visit various public houses on St Stephen's Day - are listed. The practice of winterage in the Burren, herding cattle from the lowlands up to the highlands for grazing over winter, also made the cut.

Irish Independent

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