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A nation once again: Does rugby show the path to a united Ireland?

With Brexit and the election reviving talk of a united Ireland, Kim Bielenberg asks if we could cope with the dramatic adjustments it would bring - with a new anthem and flag, huge costs and the DUP in the Dáil

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Divide: the latest survey puts support for Irish unity in the North at 29pc, with 52pc in favour of staying in the UK

Divide: the latest survey puts support for Irish unity in the North at 29pc, with 52pc in favour of staying in the UK

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'Ireland’s Call': Robbie Henshaw (left), son of an engineer from Athlone, and Jacob Stockdale, son of an Armagh Presbyterian preacher, will line out against England tomorrow. Sportsfile

'Ireland’s Call': Robbie Henshaw (left), son of an engineer from Athlone, and Jacob Stockdale, son of an Armagh Presbyterian preacher, will line out against England tomorrow. Sportsfile

Analysis: the cover of The Economist last week

Analysis: the cover of The Economist last week

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Divide: the latest survey puts support for Irish unity in the North at 29pc, with 52pc in favour of staying in the UK

At 3pm tomorrow, 15 bulky representatives of Irish manhood from north and south of the border will step out on to a field at Twickenham to play England in rugby.

Jacob Stockdale, son of an Armagh Presbyterian preacher man, and Robbie Henshaw, son of an engineer from Athlone, will line out alongside each other for a team that unites the island.

Recognising the fact that the team comes from both jurisdictions, the Irish national anthem will not be played. Instead, we will hear 'Ireland's Call', an anthem that grates on the nerves of some listeners, but which recognises the diversity of the team.