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‘A beautiful idea’ – council votes to rename bridge in Bloody Sunday commemoration

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"Hopefully, when crowds again go to Croke Park, they will see and appreciate Bloody Sunday Bridge." Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

"Hopefully, when crowds again go to Croke Park, they will see and appreciate Bloody Sunday Bridge." Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

"Hopefully, when crowds again go to Croke Park, they will see and appreciate Bloody Sunday Bridge." Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

DUBLIN City councillors have voted unanimously to rename Clonliffe Bridge, at the canal end of Croke Park, Bloody Sunday Bridge as the centenary of one of the most tragic days in Irish history approaches.

Now the proposal will go to the council’s Arts, Culture, Leisure and Recreation Strategic Policy Committee.

Then it may be referred to the Commemorative Naming Commission.

The move is a “beautiful idea” according to Michael Nelson, a nephew of Joseph Traynor (20) who was fatally wounded on Bloody Sunday on November 21, 1920.

Mr Nelson, who is in his 70s, said: “Regarding the renaming of the bridge as Bloody Sunday Bridge, it’s a fitting memorial to remind future generations of all those people who went to Croke Park on that day, with no ulterior motive but to enjoy the Dublin-Tipperary challenge match.

“Fourteen of them, including a bride-to-be, three schoolboys and my uncle Joe left their homes that morning to never get home again.

“I think it’s a beautiful idea,” he added.

Fourteen people were killed and 60 were wounded on Bloody Sunday, when the Black and Tans, auxiliary troops and the RIC, opened fire on a crowd attending the football match.

As the country prepares to mark the 100-year anniversary of the tragedy, Mr Nelson said he was “thrilled” to learn that Love Lane, in nearby Ballybough, was to be named Joe Traynor Way.

The proposed naming of the bridge has been led by Independent councillors Nial Ring and Cieran Perry.

Mr Ring – former Lord Mayor of Dublin – has also spearheaded the naming of a laneway.

Mr Nelson thanked Cllr Ring - whose grandfather and grand uncles carried the fatally wounded Joe to an ambulance through Love Lane that fateful day.

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“Councillor Nial Ring and the Traynor family are related through history – it was Nial’s grandfather and grand uncles who carried uncle Joe, bleeding and unconscious from their house through Love Lane to Sackville Avenue, where they had summoned an ambulance to pick him up.

“Our Traynor family favour the gallantry of Nial’s ancestors for their efforts to save uncle Joe.

“This was a most charitable act, which resulted in Nial’s ancestors being interned in Ballykinlar Camp in Co Down.

“So naming the laneway Joe Traynor Way is indeed something we will relish.”

Cllr Ring said: "It’s very fitting we decided to rename the bridge Bloody Sunday Bridge, as we approach the centenary of the massacre of innocent civilians in Croke Park.

"The process will now commence to get the renaming approved… and hopefully when crowds again go to Croke Park they will see and appreciate Bloody Sunday Bridge.”

A Dublin City Council spokesman said: “At the Central Area Committee meeting, which took place on Tuesday, November 10, this emergency motion was tabled and agreed.

“This will now be referred to the Arts, Culture, Leisure and Recreation SPC who can consider it and it will then be referred to the Commemorative Naming Committee.”


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