| 12.2°C Dublin

Close

Premium

'I waited a long time to hear a compliment from my mother': Stephen Rea on growing up in Belfast and why he knew he wouldn’t win an Oscar for the Crying Game

As he prepares to direct a new piece for the Abbey Theatre, acting legend Stephen Rea talks to Dónal Lynch about why he knew he wouldn't win an Oscar for his role in The Crying Game, waiting a lifetime to receive a compliment from his mother, and why he thinks Taoiseach Micheál Martin wants to prevent a united Ireland

Close

Stephen Rea

Stephen Rea

Jaye Davidson and Stephen Rea in The Crying Game (1992)

Jaye Davidson and Stephen Rea in The Crying Game (1992)

Stephen as Ned Broy in MIchael Collins (1996)

Stephen as Ned Broy in MIchael Collins (1996)

Ticket for Bloody Sunday 1919

Ticket for Bloody Sunday 1919

/

Stephen Rea

It's the dead of a lockdown night in Dublin and, as the camera pans through the deserted streets, Stephen Rea's desolate lilt is the soundtrack to all that has been lost. A city's life force is waning and the actor reads an extract from Samuel Beckett's Malone Dies, in which the narrator portends his own end. "I shall soon be quite dead, at last, in spite of all. Then it will be the month of April, or of May, when the year is still young, a thousand little signs tell me so. Perhaps I'm wrong… I would not put it past me to limp on to the transfiguration, but I do not think so."

The reading features in a recent short film, Throes. It was, director Neil Jordan informed Rea afterwards, their 12th film together. It's a collaborative journey that has taken in some of the highlights of Irish cinematic history, including Michael Collins (1996), The Butcher Boy (1997) and Jordan's dark and glittering masterpiece, The Crying Game (1992).


Related topics


Most Watched





Privacy