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TV review: Murder at the Cottage is compelling for its rawness, but so many crucial questions remain unanswered

Family of Sophie Toscan du Plantier asked Sky to remove their contributions after they perceived true-crime series to be overly sympathetic to Ian Bailey

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French film producer Sophie Toscan du Plantier was beaten to death near her holiday home in Cork in December 1996.

French film producer Sophie Toscan du Plantier was beaten to death near her holiday home in Cork in December 1996.

Ian Bailey was convicted, in absentia, of the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier by a French court. However, a new true-crime series outlines how there is a distinct lack of evidence to support such a conviction.

Ian Bailey was convicted, in absentia, of the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier by a French court. However, a new true-crime series outlines how there is a distinct lack of evidence to support such a conviction.

Director Jim Sheridan. Photo: Fergal Phillips

Director Jim Sheridan. Photo: Fergal Phillips

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French film producer Sophie Toscan du Plantier was beaten to death near her holiday home in Cork in December 1996.

THE big news just before the release of Jim Sheridan’s true-crime series Murder at the Cottage: The Search for Justice for Sophie (Sky Crime Sunday; all episodes available on demand) was that the family of Sophie Toscan du Plantier had requested their contributions to the documentary be removed. Sky complied.

Her parents, Georges and Marguerite, and her son, Pierre-Louis, were interviewed on camera. When they agreed to do it, they said, they believed Mr Sheridan was making a series about justice being done for Ms du Plantier, the 39-year-old French film producer who was beaten to death outside her holiday home in Schull, Co Cork, in December, 1996.


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