Monday 16 September 2019

Netflix-inspired Irish documentary series to revisit several gross miscarriages of justice

BIG HUG: Anne McCabe, widow of Garda Jerry McCabe, greets Garda Commissioner Noirin O’Sullivan. Photo: David Conachy
BIG HUG: Anne McCabe, widow of Garda Jerry McCabe, greets Garda Commissioner Noirin O’Sullivan. Photo: David Conachy
Detective Jerry McCabe Photo: LIAM BURKE/PRESS 22

Payu Tiwari

A new TG4 will revisit several gross miscarriages of justice that have taken place in Ireland in the recent past.

TG4’s Finné, which is set to air from this Wednesday, is an Irish documentary series that will examine “the human side of big Irish stories that have made the headlines over the past 50 years.”

The series will cover cases including the manslaughter of Una Lynskey in 1971, the murder of Jerry McCabe in 1996 and the Wood Quay saga of 1979.

Makers say the series will include first person testimonies by people who are “still bearing witness” to these incidents and “living with the consequences.”

Ann McCabe will speak of events surrounding the murder of her husband Jerry McCabe in Adare in 1996, and her subsequent efforts to bring his killers to justice.

The show will be presented by RTE’s courts correspondent, Orla O’Donnell.

Producer Paddy Hayes, who has also written and directed three of the eight episodes, said that the series allows individuals to to tell “their raw and powerful stories in their own words.”

“It is only through searing personal testimony that we gain real insight into the human story behind the official accounts of these life-changing events,” he said.

“Finné allows each individual the time and the freedom to tell their raw and powerful stories in their own words.”

Gail O’Rorke will re-tell how she was charged with the assisted suicide of her best friend Bernadette Ford in 2016.

While George Stagg will recount the bizarre events surrounding the government’s hijacking of his brother Frank Stagg’s body after his death on hunger strike in 1976.

Peter Mulryan recounts his upbringing in the Tuam mother and baby home and his subsequent quest to find his mother which led him to Galway’s Magdalene laundry.

Louise Hannon relives her experience of transitioning from male to female and her efforts to take a case against her employers in 2011 on discrimination grounds.

Pat Wallace recalls the heady days of the Wood Quay saga in 1979 when as chief archaeologist, he had to overcome the public outcry and appease the council authorities whilst still managing to excavate the site before construction took place.

Osgur Breatnach re-visits his nightmarish conviction for the robbery of the mail train at Sallins, and his subsequent efforts to quash the conviction.

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