Saturday 19 October 2019

'I'm afraid to look at those episodes now' - Fair City star Tony Tormey reveals make-up department used to use eyeshadow to mask baldness

Tony is the only surviving original cast member as the soap celebrates its 30th anniversary next week

Tony Tormey
Tony Tormey
Melanie Finn

Melanie Finn

Tony Tormey may be Fair City's resident bad boy and the soap's only surviving original character as the show approaches its 30th anniversary next week.

But the actor who plays Paul Brennan is nothing like his alter-ego in real life and is a true family man at heart.

Asked how he will be celebrating the show's milestone anniversary, he said he would be happy to chill out at home with his wife Kate and children as he savoured the moment.

"The anniversary is on the Wednesday so I'll be at home with the wife and kids having a glass of bubbly or maybe a glass of Jack Daniels," he told the Herald.

"On the Friday I think there's a bit of a do going on in McCoy's pub. Executive producer Brigie de Courcy is getting everyone together to celebrate."

He said it was hard to believe it had been three decades since the show first aired, saying his voice was "much higher then" and he had some lofty aspirations.

He recalled how the make-up department even had to use eye shadow on his pate when he first started going bald.

"I'm afraid to look at any of those episodes now and it was my fault, it wasn't make-up's fault," he said.

"I thought I was James Dean and little did I realise that he was never bald, so maybe there's where I was going wrong.

"It's all a long time ago since I started out filming in the early days in Drumcondra so it's all gone by in the blink of an eye.

"If someone had told me that day when I came into the audition that I was still going to be here in 30 years, I would have said, 'Yeah, good luck.'"

He considers himself very fortunate that his character has managed to last the pace in a show that has seen scores of actors through its doors.

"I've been lucky. I'm one of the few actors in Ireland that's been working constantly and people love the show," he said.

"It's still relevant today as it keeps up with social issues, which is great.

"I think that's why it still holds its popularity," he added.

Herald

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