Tuesday 25 June 2019

'I was singing like a maniac in my kitchen yesterday' - Ryan Tubridy hoping to be on song for Late Late Toy Show

Broadcaster Ryan Tubridy officially launched the SVP appeal as pupils from St Margaret’s National School, St Margaret’s, Dublin and St Josephs’ Primary School, Tipperary Town 
were singing Christmas carols. Picture Colm Mahady / Fennells - Copyright© Fennell Photography 2018
Broadcaster Ryan Tubridy officially launched the SVP appeal as pupils from St Margaret’s National School, St Margaret’s, Dublin and St Josephs’ Primary School, Tipperary Town  were singing Christmas carols. Picture Colm Mahady / Fennells - Copyright© Fennell Photography 2018
Fao; Picture Desk 14112018 - no reproduction fee As Christmas looms SVP is receiving an average of 1,000 calls a day seeking help Despite the improvement in the national economic figures, calls to the Society of St Vincent de Paul (SVP) are at a very high level. “Last year our volunteers visited approximately 50,000 families over the winter and we expect to visit at least the same number this year. At the moment  we are receiving over 1,000 calls a day to our offices around the country”, said SVP National President Kieran Stafford at the launch of the Society’s Annual Appeal. Save someone from a life of poverty is the theme of the SVP Annual Appeal which emphasises the effect of poverty on children and their future. Broadcaster Ryan Tubridy officially launched the appeal as pupils from St Margaret’s National School, St Margaret’s, Dublin and St Josephs’ Primary School, Tipperary Town  were singing Christmas carols. A group of Young SVP students from Tulla, Co. Clare closed the event by performing a song especially written for the launch. Pictured are Ryan Tubridy with pupils from St. Margaret's National School, Dublin and pupils from St. Joseph's National School Clonmel. Picture Colm Mahady / Fennells - Copyright© Fennell Photography 2018
Fao; Picture Desk 14112018 - no reproduction fee As Christmas looms SVP is receiving an average of 1,000 calls a day seeking help Despite the improvement in the national economic figures, calls to the Society of St Vincent de Paul (SVP) are at a very high level. “Last year our volunteers visited approximately 50,000 families over the winter and we expect to visit at least the same number this year. At the moment  we are receiving over 1,000 calls a day to our offices around the country”, said SVP National President Kieran Stafford at the launch of the Society’s Annual Appeal. Save someone from a life of poverty is the theme of the SVP Annual Appeal which emphasises the effect of poverty on children and their future. Broadcaster Ryan Tubridy officially launched the appeal as pupils from St Margaret’s National School, St Margaret’s, Dublin and St Josephs’ Primary School, Tipperary Town  were singing Christmas carols. A group of Young SVP students from Tulla, Co. Clare closed the event by performing a song especially written for the launch. Pictured are Ryan Tubridy with pupils from St. Margaret's National School, Dublin and pupils from St. Joseph's National School Clonmel. Picture Colm Mahady / Fennells - Copyright© Fennell Photography 2018
Fao; Picture Desk 14112018 - no reproduction fee As Christmas looms SVP is receiving an average of 1,000 calls a day seeking help Despite the improvement in the national economic figures, calls to the Society of St Vincent de Paul (SVP) are at a very high level. “Last year our volunteers visited approximately 50,000 families over the winter and we expect to visit at least the same number this year. At the moment  we are receiving over 1,000 calls a day to our offices around the country”, said SVP National President Kieran Stafford at the launch of the Society’s Annual Appeal. Save someone from a life of poverty is the theme of the SVP Annual Appeal which emphasises the effect of poverty on children and their future. Broadcaster Ryan Tubridy officially launched the appeal as pupils from St Margaret’s National School, St Margaret’s, Dublin and St Josephs’ Primary School, Tipperary Town  were singing Christmas carols. A group of Young SVP students from Tulla, Co. Clare closed the event by performing a song especially written for the launch. Pictured are Ryan Tubridy give a high five to pupils from St. Margaret's National School, Dublin and pupils from St. Joseph's National School Clonmel. Picture Colm Mahady / Fennells - Copyright© Fennell Photography 2018
Fao; Picture Desk 14112018 - no reproduction fee As Christmas looms SVP is receiving an average of 1,000 calls a day seeking help Despite the improvement in the national economic figures, calls to the Society of St Vincent de Paul (SVP) are at a very high level. “Last year our volunteers visited approximately 50,000 families over the winter and we expect to visit at least the same number this year. At the moment  we are receiving over 1,000 calls a day to our offices around the country”, said SVP National President Kieran Stafford at the launch of the Society’s Annual Appeal. Save someone from a life of poverty is the theme of the SVP Annual Appeal which emphasises the effect of poverty on children and their future. Broadcaster Ryan Tubridy officially launched the appeal as pupils from St Margaret’s National School, St Margaret’s, Dublin and St Josephs’ Primary School, Tipperary Town  were singing Christmas carols. A group of Young SVP students from Tulla, Co. Clare closed the event by performing a song especially written for the launch. Pictured with Ryan Tubridy are pupils from St. Margaret's National School, Dublin. Picture Colm Mahady / Fennells - Copyright© Fennell Photography 2018
Sorcha O'Connor

Sorcha O'Connor

Ryan Tubridy is pulling out all the stops for his 10th Toy Show.

The Late Late Show host said he had realised his confidence was not as high as he first believed now that he's learning to sing for the opening festive number.

Traditionally, the pressure is on to up the entertainment factor when kicking-off the annual spectacular - Pat Kenny arrived on the back of an elephant in 2002.

Tubridy is gearing up to wear a "bonkers" costume for the "huge" performance.

"There have been demands made on my voice, the likes of which I have never heard before," he said.

"I've had a go at it. I was singing like a maniac in my kitchen yesterday for one hour with the soundtrack and a piece of paper with the words of the song.

"I have confidence issues - I didn't know I had them.

"I thought, 'I'm 45- years-old, you can do anything'. But no - singing in front of a million-plus people?"

Tubridy admitted that singing in a karaoke bar in London in the summer with a group of pals was the height of his musical experience.

"That's in front of a small handful of friends, this is different," he added.

Keeping up the important tradition of giving to others at Christmas is why the Late Late host also finds himself involved with St Vincent de Paul's annual appeal for a sixth successive year.

Tubridy launched the campaign yesterday at SVP House, on Dublin's Sean McDermott Street, with a little help from the students of St Margaret's National School, Dublin, and St Joseph's Primary School, Tipperary.

This year the charity - which currently receives around 1,000 calls for help each day - is asking the public to remember the vulnerability of children at Christmas.

"I was packing hampers when I was 14, 15-years-old in school and we were told that this is what you do at Christmas time and that has stayed," said Tubridy.

"It's one of those things. You hope poverty will diminish down through the years, but it's still here.

"In the recession and even in good times, poverty exists and that's why I'm here every year."

Tubridy also spoke about the controversial interview on The Late Late with former presidential candidate Peter Casey.

"I've moved on from last week, never mind the week before," he said.

"My eyes are on this Friday and the Toy Show. This is old for me."

To donate see svp.ie or call (01) 884 8200.

Read more: 'I was never going to be a slave. No way. I love my kids too much' - Ryan Tubridy on working in RTÉ

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