Wednesday 14 November 2018

'A Starbucks barista's nightmare' - Caitriona Balfe still struggles with explaining her name in the US

Caitriona Balfe on Jimmy Kimmel Live
Caitriona Balfe on Jimmy Kimmel Live
Actress Caitriona Balfe spotted with fiancée Tony McGill close to St Stephen's Green
Caitriona Balfe arrives at Starz's "Outlander" FYC Special Screening and Panel at the Linwood Dunn Theater at the Pickford Center for Motion Study on March 18, 2018 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Amanda Edwards/Getty Images)
Caitriona Balfe (R) and Sam Heughan attend the "Outlander" Season Two World Premiere at American Museum of Natural History on April 4, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Robin Marchant/Getty Images)
Actress Caitriona Balfe attends the New York Red Carpet Premiere of Outlander Season Three, Hosted by Starz and Entertainment Weekly in New York on September 5, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Entertainment Weekly)
Sam Heughan (L) and actress Caitriona Balfe arrive at Starz's "Outlander" FYC Special Screening and Panel at the Linwood Dunn Theater at the Pickford Center for Motion Study on March 18, 2018 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Amanda Edwards/Getty Images)

Lynne Kelleher

Outlander star Caitriona Balfe says the spelling of her name often causes confusion.

The Golden Globe-nominated actress had to give a tutorial on the pronunciation of her name to US chat show host Jimmy Kimmel. The American host joked that it was a "Starbucks barista's nightmare".

"And I sort of had to lose the fada, because I was computer illiterate and didn't know where to find it [on the keyboard]."

The 39-year-old Dublin actress confirmed she has just finished filming action movie Ford vs. Ferrari directed by James Mangold.

The biopic, which co-stars Christian Bale and Matt Damon, centres on the true story of the battle between car giants Ford and Ferrari to win Le Mans in 1966.

It follows US automotive visionary Carroll Shelby, played by Matt Damon, and his British driver, Ken Miles, played by Christian Bale, who are tasked by Henry Ford II with defeating the perennially dominant Ferrari. The statuesque actress was accompanied on the show by her fiance, Tony McGill, to promote the forthcoming fourth season of her smash hit series, Outlander.

Actress Caitriona Balfe attends the New York Red Carpet Premiere of Outlander Season Three, Hosted by Starz and Entertainment Weekly in New York on September 5, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Entertainment Weekly)
Actress Caitriona Balfe attends the New York Red Carpet Premiere of Outlander Season Three, Hosted by Starz and Entertainment Weekly in New York on September 5, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Entertainment Weekly)

The model-turned-actress has become a household name in the award-winning role of time-travelling English heroine Claire Randall, who falls for a Scottish warrior. She said that while she is always careful not to reveal any spoilers, the period drama is based on a series of books which have been published for years.

"It's funny when we go to do these press things. We're told, 'This is a spoiler, that's a spoiler'. But it's in a book, on a shelf, in a bookstore."

She said the programme makers do not veer too much from the original books, written by Diana Gabaldon.

"Diana is such a huge part of our show," said Balfe. "She's been on the show and written an episode.

The first Outlander novel was published in 1991, so the TV show had a ready-made fanbase before it was even aired, said Balfe.

"Outlander is huge. When we started, we filmed for about two months. I was brought to this auditorium where there was about 2,000 fans who went mental." She also told the US chat show how Halloween originated in Ireland.

"I guess it was a druidic festival, where they felt all the souls roamed the earth that day and it became Halloween," she said. "So, it's ours."

And she said the festival is more defined by the scare factor than cuteness when it comes to the costumers worn by Irish children.

"When I was a kid, it always had to be something scary. It was very occult, so it was ghost or witches or vampires, that kind of thing."

Herald

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