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Nick Cave’s Seven Psalms is a haunting dreamscape in a redemption-seeking canon

Ahead of the artist’s headline slot at the All Together Now Festival, hark at his powerful new album and how it fits into his extensive CV

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The adoration of Nick Cave. Picture by Megan Cullen

The adoration of Nick Cave. Picture by Megan Cullen

Nick Cave and Warren Ellis wig out. Picture by Megan Cullen

Nick Cave and Warren Ellis wig out. Picture by Megan Cullen

Nick Cave goes crowd surfing. Picture by Megan Cullen

Nick Cave goes crowd surfing. Picture by Megan Cullen

Nick Cave with the Birthday Party at The Ace, Brixton, London in April 1982. Picture by David Corio/Redferns

Nick Cave with the Birthday Party at The Ace, Brixton, London in April 1982. Picture by David Corio/Redferns

Arthur Cave (15) fell from a seaside cliff and died in July 2015

Arthur Cave (15) fell from a seaside cliff and died in July 2015

Jethro Lazenby Cave died tragically this year at the age of 30

Jethro Lazenby Cave died tragically this year at the age of 30

Nick Cave and Susie Bick

Nick Cave and Susie Bick

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The adoration of Nick Cave. Picture by Megan Cullen

A few years ago, Emma McEvoy at the University of Westminster wrote a controversial scholarly paper ‘The Sad Demise of Nick Cave’. In it, she wrote that the man who once came across like a post-punk Lord Byron on heroin, Cave’s drug of choice in the 1980s, had “fallen prey to sincerity.”

I can only hope she doesn’t listen to his new mini album Seven Psalms, seven spoken-word pieces of one to two minutes each about God and faith, love and death, mercy and grief.


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