Sunday 19 November 2017

Irish music fans warned about increasing number of counterfeit tickets flooding websites

Dusty Hill and Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top wow the crowds
Dusty Hill and Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top wow the crowds
BOOGIETASTIC: ZZ Top guitarists Billy Gibbons, right, and Dusty Hill
Musician, singer and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boys Al Jardine performs on stage with Brian Wilson at ACL Live on May 13, 2017 in Austin, Texas. / AFP PHOTO / SUZANNE CORDEIRO (Photo credit should read SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)

Sasha Brady and Aoife Kelly

At least 60 music fans were left disappointed and out of pocket last week when they were refused entry to concerts with invalid tickets.

Concert promoters Aiken are warning fans to be aware of ticket scams.

People are now more likely to be duped into purchasing fake tickets from secondary websites.

A number of fans were turned away from the ZZ Top and Brian Wilson concerts last weekend.

Musician, singer and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boys Al Jardine performs on stage with Brian Wilson at ACL Live on May 13, 2017 in Austin, Texas. / AFP PHOTO / SUZANNE CORDEIRO (Photo credit should read SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
Musician, singer and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boys Al Jardine performs on stage with Brian Wilson at ACL Live on May 13, 2017 in Austin, Texas. / AFP PHOTO / SUZANNE CORDEIRO (Photo credit should read SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)

One music fan had paid almost €1,000 for two tickets to see Beach Boys legend Wilson perform at the Bord Gais Energy Theatre in Dublin. The tickets did not exist.

Peter Aiken of Aiken Promotions said the fan "went mental" when he could not gain entry to the venue.

The promoters were unable to accommodate him as tickets to the concert had sold out weeks beforehand.

Mr Aiken is now warning fans to be wary when purchasing tickets from secondary websites after he witnessed first-hand people being turned away from his concerts.

He said: “At ZZ Top on Friday, at least 60 people turned up at the venue who had bought tickets through secondary websites. These tickets were not valid which caused distress and disappointment to these fans.

"Unfortunately it is not likely these people will get the money they paid refunded.

He added: "As a promoter, it is extremely frustrating to see people being exploited like this and I would like to emphasise once again that fans should not purchase tickets from any secondary sellers."

In July, a young U2 fan and her dad were left devastated outside Croke Park on Saturday night when their tickets for U2's gig proved to be fake.

Aimee Keaveney (22) and her dad Sean, from Manchester, flew in to Dublin on Friday night ahead of the Dublin band's homecoming Joshua Tree Tour 2017 show.

They failed to bag tickets via Ticketmaster but managed to secure two tickets, at the hefty price of £400 (€446) each, from Viagogo, an online ticket marketplace.

"My dad paid a great deal of money for these tickets and worked hard to pay for them as he loved the Joshua Tree album and we were looking forward to it for ages," she said.  "We really wanted to go."

However, when Aimee and her dad arrived at Croke Park and had their tickets scanned they were told the tickets had already been used 30 minutes previously.

Aimee claimed there were "hundreds" of other people who had also been sold fake tickets from various sources stranded outside the venue.

"We were all just sent to the same spot to stand and be told there was nothing that could be done as the show was a complete sell out," she says.

"My dad and I met a group of three in the same position as us - two women and a man.  They had flown all the way from India to be at the gig and their tickets were fake too."

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