Thursday 13 December 2018

'I enjoy every day as I don't know how much time I've got' - Aslan's Christy Dignam

Philly McMahon, pictured in the Helix UCD with Aslan lead singer Christie Dignam at the launch of his autobiography, The Choice
Philly McMahon, pictured in the Helix UCD with Aslan lead singer Christie Dignam at the launch of his autobiography, The Choice
Sean O'Grady

Sean O'Grady

Christy Dignam says he doesn't spend much time thinking about the future these days as he doesn't know how long he "is going to be here for".

The Aslan frontman (57) was diagnosed with a rare form of blood cancer in 2013 and has been battling the illness ever since.

Although he has come to terms with the fact his illness is terminal, the singer is still enjoying life.

"I don't look too far ahead because I don't know how long I am going to be here for. I just try to live in the moment and enjoy today," he said.

Christy Dignam
Christy Dignam

Dignam went on to say that he is in remission and feeling "normal" as a result.

"The condition I have is terminal, there is no cure for it. I am in a remission situation at the moment, which is better than nothing.

"The disease is not cured but it's being held at bay, so that's good. I feel normal.

"When the cancer is active you're in a bad way and when you're doing chemotherapy you're in a bad way," he told the Herald.

Dignam is keeping focused on work, continuing to record with Aslan, while also working on a new record.

"I am working all the way up to Christmas and recording a single. We haven't got a name for it yet but it's written," he said.

"I am also doing an album with Finbar Furey at the moment."

Dignam has been open about his struggles with drug addiction in the past.

The Dubliner believes the key to making a successful recovery is to not isolate yourself from others, saying he had dark thoughts during his own struggles with addiction.

"There's help out there if you look for it. Don't isolate yourself. The one thing every addict does is that they isolate themselves," he said.

"I remember being in Ballymun towers, I was on the sixth floor and I dropped a penny to see how long it took to hit the ground.

"It took one-and-a-half seconds, I think it was. If I jumped off this, all the s**t would be over. That was a few years ago.

"That's the type of head space you get into from being on your own."

Herald

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