| 20°C Dublin

Mick Jagger offers update on new Rolling Stones album

He was joined by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page on BBC Radio 2.

Close

Sir Mick Jagger (Jane Barlow/PA)

Sir Mick Jagger (Jane Barlow/PA)

Sir Mick Jagger (Jane Barlow/PA)

Sir Mick Jagger has said he is working on The Rolling Stones’ latest album from home but that it will not be released until the band can get back in the studio together.

The veteran rock and rollers released a new track, Living In A Ghost Town, which was mostly recorded before lockdown and finished by the band remotely, in April this year.

Speaking on The Zoe Ball Breakfast Show on BBC Radio 2, Sir Mick said there were more songs from those sessions but fans should not expect to hear them soon.

Asked when they might be released, he said: “I don’t know. We recorded some at the same time as we did Ghost Town.

Close

Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones (Jane Barlow/PA)

Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones (Jane Barlow/PA)

PA

Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones (Jane Barlow/PA)

“We recorded a bunch of tracks that, actually, I have been finishing off the vocals and some other instruments on them, and doing some mixes on them. I am working on it.

“We have got to get together and do a couple more sessions, I think. We are not really going to get together right now.

“But what we have already done sounds pretty good to me.”

Sir Mick, 76, was joined by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, also 76, to discuss Scarlet, a lost Rolling Stones song from October 1974 which Page played on.

The song is being released as part of a Goats Head Soup album reissue.

Sir Mick said: “It was recorded in Ronnie Wood’s basement of his house.

“Sounds very rock and roll doesn’t it? But I must say it was the basement of a very luxurious house.

“It was Keith (Richards) and me and then Jimmy Page turned up for some reason. We had various other musicians.

Close

Jimmy Page (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

Jimmy Page (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

PA

Jimmy Page (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

“We ran through this, among other things, and then Keith and I focused on it. But since then I had completely forgotten about it.”

Page said he remembered the sessions feeling “really special” at the time.

He said: “Some things I do remember in great clarity, especially if it is something special and this really was.

“Working with Keith, it was something from scratch almost.

“He was playing it and then everyone was joining in and working their parts out to it.

“The following day, putting the guitar solos on, I knew it was something really special at the time. It just felt really great.

“And then more recently Mick got in contact and he sent me a copy of the finished version and I thought, ‘Oh my goodness, that sounds so cool’.”

Close

Members of Led Zeppelin Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Bonham in 1970 (PA)

Members of Led Zeppelin Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Bonham in 1970 (PA)

PA

Members of Led Zeppelin Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Bonham in 1970 (PA)

Page also rubbished the idea Led Zeppelin could stage a comeback tour, after reforming in 2007 at the O2 Arena in London, with original member John Bonham’s son Jason on drums.

He said: “At the time we thought – myself, John Paul Jones and Jason – that it was an idea.

“It was said that there were going to be some more dates.

“It would have been really great to have done that after the O2 because we had put a lot of work into the O2 and we were really on it.

“But it didn’t come off and it seems really unlikely that there would be a tour in the future.”

He added: “Talking about the concert, it was gigantic at the time but it was 2007 and time passes.”

PA Media