Entertainment Music

Saturday 21 July 2018

'It takes a lot more to be taken seriously' - Dua Lipa calls out sexism in music industry

It takes a lot more to be taken seriously as a singer if you’re female, the star told GQ magazine.

Dua Lipa won two Brits at last week’s ceremony (Victoria Jones/PA)
Dua Lipa won two Brits at last week’s ceremony (Victoria Jones/PA)

By Laura Harding, Press Association Senior Entertainment Correspondent

Dua Lipa has spoken about sexism in the music industry, saying it is harder for female singers to be taken seriously.

The performer, 22, said men are given the benefit of the doubt that they pen their own tracks, while women are not.

She told British GQ: “For a female artist, it takes a lot more to be taken seriously if you’re not sat down at a piano or with a guitar, you know?

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“For a male artist, people instantly assume they write their own music, but for women, they assume it’s all manufactured.”

Dua Lipa has spoken out about sexism and the Me Too movement (Ian West/PA)
Dua Lipa has spoken out about sexism and the Me Too movement (Ian West/PA)

Lipa also addressed the Me Too movement, saying she has not faced any sexual harassment but sees how deeply some behaviour is rooted in society.

She said: “I’m lucky in that I haven’t really had any sexual harassment in any way. But I think (Me Too) is so important.

“You know, even from school, growing up with kiss chase or whatever, it’s been ingrained in our heads that boys will be boys and it’s harmless fun and no big deal and to brush things off.

“Like catcalling. To some it might not seem a lot, but it affects your mood, people get embarrassed about the way they dress.

“For lots of females, be it actresses, singers, models, no matter what it is, it’s not being able to have the right to dress and wear how and what you want and be taken seriously.”

Lipa also said she is already at work on her second album, telling the magazine: “It’s very much dance crying. It is a pop album that you’re going to be able to dance to, but a lot of the songs are sad.

“They’re about heartbreak and they’re about going through some emotional manipulation. It kind of sucks that that’s the thing that triggers my creativity, but happy things don’t seem to do it for me.”

The May issue of GQ is on Sale on April 5.

Press Association

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