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'If we'd listened, we'd be a 20-piece jazz fusion band playing on the Moon'

The Lost Brothers are finally reaping the rewards having kept a sharp focus on their musical principles, steered clear of temptation to follow trends or listened to bar-room advice on the path they should take

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Wistful folk songs: Mark McCausland and Oisin Leech of The Lost Brothers

Wistful folk songs: Mark McCausland and Oisin Leech of The Lost Brothers

John Blek

John Blek

Junior Brother

Junior Brother

Maija Sofia

Maija Sofia

Anna Mieke

Anna Mieke

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Wistful folk songs: Mark McCausland and Oisin Leech of The Lost Brothers

It started like this for The Lost Brothers: people didn't know what to make of their music. Was it a cross between The Everly Brothers and long-lost demo recordings of Simon and Garfunkel? Was it the illegitimate offspring of Woody Guthrie, Buddy Holly and Richard Hawley crooning from the crib?

Whatever it was, and whatever it has developed into over the past 12 years, those same people who were initially puzzled have, gradually, allowed the music in. If there's a lesson there for other musicians, then it is surely this: persist, persevere and never change musical direction to appeal to tastemakers.

"You have to have a certain kind of tunnel vision," says Mark McCausland.