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Blind

Blind

Blind

American drama series often differ from European ones in that they lay their stalls out right at the beginning. We mightn't realise initially that this is going to be the story arc, that Don Draper is afraid they're going to see through him, that Walter White is going to go bad, but on reflection, you always realise it was there at the beginning. It's a model that Eskil Vogt's first directorial outing follows when his main character, Ingrid (Ellen Dorrit Petersen) narrating the piece says: "It's not important what's real as long as I can visualise it."

In her thirties, Ingrid has gone blind and while adjusting to her life with a series of gadgets, which give great insight into some of the practicalities of life without sight, she refuses to leave her apartment.

Her husband Morten, (Henrik Rafaelsen), an architect whom she describes as boring, in a nice way, is kind, caring, but busy and a little frustrated with Ingrid's refusal to leave the house.

Ingrid suggests he comes back to the house in secret to watch her. She also narrates the story of Elin (Vera Vitali) a Swedish woman stuck in Oslo by a shared custody agreement, and Einar (Marius Kalbenstvedt) a loner with a (graphically depicted) porn obsession who fixates on Elin. We think we are watching these things as they happen.

Its cleverness however comes at the cost of emotional warmth. Visually it's the epitome of cool skandi style, but emotionally it is just as cool, although funny in places the reveal and subsequent warmth land a little too late. Still I found this really interesting and original, with excellent acting in tough roles.

AO'C

Sunday Independent