| 4.1°C Dublin

War epic '1917' is the big gun at Baftas as Irish left out in cold

Close

Saoirse Ronan poses on the red carpet upon arrival at the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Photo: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images

Saoirse Ronan poses on the red carpet upon arrival at the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Photo: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images

AFP via Getty Images

Saoirse Ronan poses on the red carpet upon arrival at the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Photo: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images

There was little luck for the Irish at the Baftas last night as war epic '1917' swept the boards in a night hosted by Graham Norton.

Saoirse Ronan and Jessie Buckley both went home empty-handed, beaten in the Best Actress category by Renée Zellweger, who won for her role in 'Judy'.

Meanwhile, Sam Mendes's '1917', based on a story told to him by his grandfather, won seven of the nine prizes for which it was nominated, including best film, outstanding British film, best director and best cinematography.

Irish actor Andrew Scott shared the stage with Mendes as one of the cast when '1917' was named best film.

Close

Pleased: Irish actor Andrew Scott is among the cast of best film ‘1917’. Photo: ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP via Getty Images

Pleased: Irish actor Andrew Scott is among the cast of best film ‘1917’. Photo: ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP via Getty Images

AFP via Getty Images

Joaquin Phoenix was named best actor for 'Joker' and used his speech to address the fact only white performers were nominated this year.

He said: "I feel very honoured and privileged to be here tonight - Bafta has always been very supportive of my career and I'm deeply appreciative. But I have to say that I also feel conflicted because so many of my fellow actors that are deserving don't have that same privilege.

"I think we send a clear message to people of colour that you're not welcome here, I think that's the message we're sending to people that have contributed so much to our medium and our industry and in ways that we benefit from."

Laura Dern was named best supporting actress for 'Marriage Story'.

Brad Pitt, who was named best supporting actor for 'Once Upon A Time...In Hollywood', missed the ceremony because of "family obligations" but asked co-star Margot Robbie to read his speech, saying; "Hey Britain, heard you just became single, welcome to the club. Wishing you the best with the divorce settlement."

She added: "He says he is going to name this Harry because he is really excited about bringing it back to the States with him. His words not mine."

Close

Irish actress Aisling Bea poses on the red carpet upon arrival at the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Photo: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images

Irish actress Aisling Bea poses on the red carpet upon arrival at the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Photo: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images

AFP via Getty Images

Roger Deakins's win for best cinematography for '1917' made him the most-decorated winner of that category, while Mendes won his first directing prize, making him the first UK winner in the category since Danny Boyle won for 'Slumdog Millionaire'.

The outstanding contribution to cinema award was presented to Andy Serkis.

Irish Independent