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Rising stars: Irish actors on list of Bafta nominees

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Exciting: Dubliner Barry Keoghan starred in ‘Dunkirk’ and ‘American Animals’. Photo: Samir Hussein/WireImage

Exciting: Dubliner Barry Keoghan starred in ‘Dunkirk’ and ‘American Animals’. Photo: Samir Hussein/WireImage

WireImage

Exciting: Dubliner Barry Keoghan starred in ‘Dunkirk’ and ‘American Animals’. Photo: Samir Hussein/WireImage

Irish stars Barry Keoghan and Jessie Buckley are among the five nominees in the Rising Star Award at this year's Baftas.

The coveted award, which has previously kicked off successful careers for young stars, will see Dubliner Keoghan (26) in the running for his roles in 'The Killing of a Sacred Deer', 'Dunkirk' and 'American Animals'.

"It's really exciting to be put forward for the EE Rising Star Award," he said.

"Over the years, I have watched so many actors and actresses that I admire be nominated in this category, so to think that I'm now on that list is an amazing feeling."

Kerry actress Buckley (29) received rave reviews for her performance in the thriller 'Beast' last year. She also starred in the BBC's 2016 TV adaptation of 'War and Peace'.

"I would like to thank both Baftas and the jury from the bottom of my heart for putting me forward for the 2019 EE Rising Star Award," she said.

"It's a huge honour and a fantastic category to be nominated for, especially as the winner is decided by film fans at home."

Meanwhile, the Irish star of 'Vikings', Elijah Rowan, has landed a lead role in Sky's new mega-budget series 'Curfew', alongside the likes of Billy Zane, Sean Bean and Adam Brody.

After becoming close friends with fellow Irish 'Vikings' actor Jack McEvoy, Rowan said their sights were now set on Hollywood.

"On 'Vikings', I have been constantly humbled by the level of work and talent, and being on such a high-profile show has opened up the right avenues for us to push for larger roles. We've met agents who are keen for us to succeed in the US and it's paid off with us entering a new acting arena," he said.

Irish Independent